Interesting facts about aquariums

An aquarium is an indispensable attribute of a lover of a variety of fish. However, not all aquariums look like a small pot-bellied container in which a lonely goldfish swims sadly - there are also truly monstrous structures that can hold a huge amount of water. Such aquariums are usually installed in public places, for example, zoos and aquariums, although you can buy one yourself - there would be enough money for the purchase itself and for its subsequent maintenance.

The world's most expensive Golden Dragon aquarium, worth about $ 5 million, was made of gold by designer Stuart Hughes.

The Radisson SAS Hotel in Berlin, Germany, houses the largest aquarium in the form of a cylinder. A huge structure is located in the lobby of the hotel, its height is 25 meters. In 900, 000 liters of seawater, 56 species of fish swim, with a school of 2, 600 specimens. The outer diameter of this aquarium is 11 meters, and the inner diameter is a little less than 3 m. The most interesting thing is that inside this aquarium-cylinder there is an elevator with a booth on two floors.

The largest cylindrical salt water aquarium is the famous AquaDom.

Astronotus ocellatus is considered the largest among aquarium fish. With its length of 35 cm, it is considered the largest fish that is kept and bred under artificial conditions. However, in aquariums, these fish reach no more than 30 cm in length.

The world's largest storage tank for sea dwellers is located in the Chime-Long Ocean Kingdom amusement park in the Chinese city of Zhuhai. According to the Guinness Book of Records, its volume is 22, 7 million liters (22, 7 thousand m³).

The first aquariums were created in England in the middle of the 19th century. And the word "aquarium" was coined by the English naturalist Philip Henry Gosse.

A long-lived aquarium fish was a female eel named Pati, who died in the Helsingborg Museum in Sweden in 1948. At the time of this sad event, she was 88 years old. She was born in the Sargasso Sea in 1860 and was caught three years later in the North Atlantic