The most interesting facts about Norway

Norway is a country that surprises with its beauty. Amazing and richest nature is the main asset of Norway, it amazes and makes you fall in love at first sight. Unfortunately, all we associate this country with are ships and Vikings. The Norwegians themselves stand for the openness of their society, so let's get to know them and their culture better.

- In Norway, education and culture are in the foreground. Here for the first time in the world, back in 1979, compulsory primary education was introduced. In elementary school, they teach not only English (from the first grade), but in addition to traditional school subjects - ecology and art. By the way, Norway spends three times more on education, and four times more on health care than on defense. At the same time, the Norwegian Air Force protects not only the borders of their country, but also the airspace of Iceland, which does not have its own army at all.

- The word Norway means "the way to the north". Many thousands of years ago, this country was hidden under a huge layer of ice.

- Thousands of tourists come to Norway every year to ride the unique 20 km Flåm railway. From the train window you can see mountains, waterfalls, rivers, lakes and fjords. The Flåm Railway is considered a true piece of engineering.

- The population of Norway is less than 5 million people. More than 1.5 million Norwegians live in the capital Oslo and its suburbs. Any city with a population of more than 30 thousand is considered large.

- Thanks to the warm Gulf Stream, the climate in Norway is quite mild and the summers are warm. The sea off the coast of northern Norway, located beyond the Arctic Circle, does not freeze even in winter, and in summer, even in the northern part of the country, the temperature rises to 20-30 ° C.

- Norwegians love and appreciate the sea. They prefer to live no further than 200-300 meters from the water, or in its line of sight. Those who live in the interior of the country still buy a second house by the sea. Boats or boats are owned by 80% of the population.

- The main means of transportation in Norway is bicycles. Norwegians prefer this type of transport in any weather.

- Norway has an incredibly changeable climate. Fog, sun, harsh wind, rain, and again fog can change with amazing frequency. The Norwegians even came up with a saying: "Don't like our weather? Wait 15 minutes."

- The coldest winter month in Norway is March, when it snows, frost and ice begin. In December, on the contrary, you can find roses that have not yet fallen.

- The nature of Norway is diverse. Forests, mountains, rivers, lakes, the sea are in their original state. The attitude to nature is very careful. There are no poachers, there is practically no garbage either. Thanks to the sea, there are no mosquitoes and other insects.

- Norway is a real kingdom, with a king and queen. Norway has a monarchy, but parliament has political power. Norwegians love and protect their monarchy. Adults are more proud than young people that they have kept the royal family.

- "Everything for Norway" - this motto is written on the coat of arms of the King of Norway. And for many years now it has served as a motto for the Kings of Norway.

- According to the law, any resident of the country and its guest has the right of unhindered access to all natural resources without restrictions - both in the forest and at sea. You can walk and swim wherever you want. If the land is private or fenced off, out of courtesy it is advisable to ask the owners for permission to visit it.

- Products in Norway of the highest quality. Especially dairy. By the way, here are the most expensive hamburgers in Europe.

- The 1999 Ice Hockey World Championship in Norway was under threat of transfer to another country if the Norwegian authorities did not allow the German beer concern "Warsteiner" to advertise its products at the championship. The problem was that back in 1977, Norway passed a law against beer advertising, and in January 1998, the authorities dealt another blow to brewers by adopting a new law that does not allow companies producing even stronger beverages to advertise light beer. ...

- Norway is considered a safe country. Here the law is respected, there is no crime, and theft is considered something unthinkable for most Norwegians. Only large retail chains have frames-detectors of theft of goods at the exit, or surveillance cameras. Otherwise, they are practically nowhere to be found. Nevertheless, the most bloody page in the history of Norway is considered the day when a Norwegian fanatic staged a terrorist attack - first he blew up a car in Oslo, after which he shot 77 civilians on the island of Utoya.

- The average salary for many Norwegians can be up to 5-7 thousand euros per month.

- There is an incredible variety of fish in Norway, so sea and lake fishing is highly developed in the country. Fishing licenses are not needed, which prompts many Europeans to come to Norway in refrigerated trucks, live in the cheapest houses or tents, fish for two weeks without a break, providing themselves with fish for 6 months in advance, and leave back. The Germans, Dutch and Belgians are perhaps the most active.

- Norway has the longest fjords in the world. The fjord is a wide, often winding and deep channel with rocky shores, piercing from the sea inland for many kilometers.

- You can drive all day in the central part of Norway, or in any other part of it, and not meet a single police car.

- In Norway it is not customary to throw away empty containers, all cans and bottles of Norwegian production are returned - there are special machines in stores that count bottles and issue a receipt. The check is presented at the checkout, where a certain amount is issued.

- Life flows very calmly and measuredly. The Norwegians start working at about 10 am, and by 4 am they finish. On weekends, only restaurants or supermarkets are open.

- Young Norwegians and even middle-aged people are very fond of science fiction and fantasy as a genre. Films like "The Lord of the Rings" or "Star Wars" are very popular here.

- On country roads, usually near the farm, you can often find a table with vegetables or fruits with prices. It will also have scales, shopping bags, and a jar for money. This is a kind of self-service. Everything is built on trust. No one is around.

- Local cuisine is simple and unpretentious. The Norwegians have succeeded in fish preparation recipes: dried, salted, smoked, etc.

- Norway has the northernmost point of mainland Europe. Called North Cape, it is located on the edge of a cliff in the far north. In good weather, you can see the edge of the Arctic glaciers.

- The Scandinavian countries (Norway and Iceland) have the highest birth rates in Europe among the indigenous rather than newcomers. The Scandinavians initially focused on improving the quality of life of the child, and not on increasing the number of births.

- It is easy to get a very large loan from a bank at 3-4 percent per annum. In Norway, everything is made for a person. You can plan your life 10 years in advance, including any expenses and career advancement.

- The state in every possible way supports the employment of the population with at least something.

The attitude towards foreigners is restrained, but friendly. Norwegians calmly invite you to visit, share food, help with advice.

- Norwegians lead a calm lifestyle. There is practically no active life outside the big cities.

- In recent years, Norway has increased the influx of immigrants from other countries.

- Flights by plane within the country as well as outside it are very cheap. At the same time, the quality of service is higher than that of European air discounters.

- Norway has the largest cumulative number of tunnels in Europe. There is one that runs under the sea channel at a depth of about 4 km.

- The hero of Norwegian folklore, the troll is a very popular symbol of many establishments. Trolls are spirits of nature, they protect it, and also help good people.

- It is almost impossible to meet begging people on the streets. The only exceptions are big cities, and almost always it is one of the immigrants. In the nineties, this did not happen at all.

- Finding a sushi restaurant or cafe that serves sushi is almost impossible. They are only found in Oslo, Bergen and Stavanger. In other cities there is only one such establishment.

- Citizens' private lives rarely become public domain. Climbing into other people's relationships is not accepted and Norwegians usually do not talk about personal ones.