Abraham Lincoln Manifesto on the Emancipation of Slaves

The American Civil War was initially fought between the North and South due to political and economic divisions between these regions. The abolition of slavery was not the main goal. However, on September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln took a new move, which became defining in this confrontation. He issued the Provisional Emancipation of Slaves, which stated that all slaves in the rebellious states or their regions would still be in revolt on January 1, 1863.

And 100 days later, on January 1, 1863, the Manifesto against the Emancipation of Slaves was issued, in which he named 10 rebellious states to which the abolition of slavery would apply. Interestingly, the manifesto extended to neutral states supporting the North. And the complete emancipation of all slaves in all states was granted by the Thirteenth Amendment to the US Constitution only more than two years later, shortly before the end of the Civil War on January 31, 1865. Nevertheless, since the proclamation of the Manifesto, the admission of African Americans into the ranks of the allied army of the northerners began. And soon it was already replenished with 200 thousand black soldiers, which turned the outcome of the war in favor of the North.

That on the first day of January in the year from the birth of Christ, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves in the territory of any state or part of a state whose population is in a state of rebellion against the United States are now and forever declared free. The executive branch of the United States, including its military and naval authorities, will recognize and promote the freedom of these individuals and will not take any action to suppress these individuals or any of them if they attempt to acquire true freedom.

That on the specified date, January 1, the executive authorities will determine by special proclamation the states and, if any, parts of the states whose population is in a state of rebellion against the United States. And in the absence of seemingly convincing evidence that a particular state and its population are not currently in a state of rebellion against the United States, all states or their populations will be duly represented in the United States Congress on that day by the deputies elected to that body at elections in which the majority of eligible voters in the state will be required to participate. "

By virtue of the above, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, on the basis of the powers granted to me as Commander-in-Chief of the United States Army and Navy, during an actual armed uprising against the United States government and the Government, as an appropriate and necessary military measure to suppress said above the uprising on this day, January 1 of the year from the birth of Christ, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my determination to do so, publicly proclaimed for a full term of one hundred days, starting from the above first day, the order and names of the states and parts of the states, whose population is correspondingly in a state of rebellion against the United States. Namely:

Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia for the rest of the states, leave as if this proclamation had not been issued for now.

And on the basis of the powers granted to me and for the reasons stated above, I order and henceforth declare free all persons held as slaves in the indicated states and their parts, and declare that the executive branch of the United States, including its military and naval organs, will to recognize and promote the freedom of these persons.

And I urge these persons to refrain from any violence not caused by the need for self-defense, and recommend in all cases permitted to them to work honestly, receiving an acceptable wage for this.

And I further declare and inform that these linden trees, in good physical shape, will be accepted into the military service of the United States to replenish the garrisons of forts, military positions of posts and other points and crews of warships of all categories, in due course for the above service.

In making this decision, sincerely regarded as just and provided for in the Constitution in case of military necessity, I appeal to the benevolent judgment of mankind and the benevolent disposition of the Almighty Lord God.

In confirmation of which, I have put my hand to this and ordered to attach the official seal of the United States.

Done at the city of Washington this first day of January in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three from the birth of Christ and the eighty-seventh year of the independence of the United States.

President Abraham Lincoln

Secretary of State William G. Seward

* Changes as of January 1, 1863 are highlighted in bold in the text of the manifesto.