Why did the natives eat Cook

Most ordinary people know about the unenviable fate of the navigator James Cook from the song of Vladimir Vysotsky "Why did the aborigines eat Cook", but in fact it is not entirely true ...

The largest British explorer James Cook made two round-the-world travels and many outstanding geographical discoveries that greatly expanded people's understanding of the world. The strait between the northern and southern islands of New Zealand, the Cook Islands archipelago and many small bays and bays are named after him. In 1778, Cook discovered the southeastern Hawaiian Islands, where the fatal events took place.

James Cook died on one of the Hawaiian islands called Kealakekua. The inhabitants of the island first became friends with the team and even thought that Cook was a god. But when the natives realized that James Cook was a simple person, they became very upset and the friendship ended. The islanders explicitly hinted to the guests to clean in good health. What James Cook did, but an evil fate, or rather a storm battered the ship before he could go out into the ocean and Cook had to return to the island to repair the mast. The islanders began to annoy the team with petty thefts ...

On February 13, 1779, one of the islanders stole tongs from a ship's carpenter, and on the night of February 14, a large boat was hijacked from one of the ships. James Cook flew into a rage and tried to take the king of the island hostage. But nothing came of this venture, and during a skirmish on February 14, 1779, the great British navigator died, and his body was carried away by local residents.

Charles Clarke, who took the place of the deceased captain, with the support of naval artillery, undertook a landing on the coast, which ended with the destruction of native settlements and the release of the remains of the head of the expedition. A basket of 10 pounds of human meat and Cook's head, devoid of a lower jaw, were brought aboard. But Cook was not going to eat at all, the aborigines dismembered his body and gave parts to the shamans, thereby showing respect to the navigator. According to local tradition, this was done only with the bodies of the strongest and most worthy rivals.